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Drug Charges Archives

College students facing charges for study drugs must act quickly

When you think of drug charges, you might think of those related to the sale, distribution, manufacturing or use of a illegal drugs. It might come as a surprise that you can face criminal charges for the use or sale of legal drugs.

The type of drug impacts the charge and potential sentence

When you're facing drug charges, the type of drugs involved -- not to mention the activity that allegedly related to the drugs -- has a big influence on what consequences you might face if you are convicted. Your own history and the type of drug can also impact whether a prosecutor is willing to work with you on a plea or negotiate reduced charges and sentencing.

Know your options to resolve drug charges in Arkansas

If you are facing drug charges in Arkansas, you might be surprised to find that there are sometimes options for how the case is resolved. One of these options is the Drug Court program. This program is meant for people who have a drug addiction and were charged with a crime. There are several different criteria for entering into the drug court program. One of the most notable is that you can't be considered a violent offender based on current or former charges.

How are cocaine convictions handled in Arkansas?

When you are accused of having cocaine in your possession in Arkansas, you may be facing some very serious charges. In fact, having even small amounts of cocaine in your possession is a felony in this state. Anyone who is facing cocaine charges should find out exactly what options they have, and they need to take the serious penalties of these charges into account when considering the options.

11 arrested for drug crimes in alleged sales of methamphetamine

Federal authorities in Arkansas recently arrested 11 of 13 defendants allegedly involved in a large-scale drug trafficking organization in Blytheville. The arrests, made on Oct. 18, all dealt with drug crimes such as the delivery of drugs or conspiring to deliver drugs. The charges pertained specifically to selling methamphetamine and various weapons possessions.

Man arrested in Walmart on drug crimes re methamphetamine

Generally, the authorities in Arkansas and elsewhere cannot arrest someone who has a strange look or who is walking aimlessly in a public place. There must be some outward manifestation of antisocial or suspicious behavior to make police intervention justifiable. An incident occurred at the Walmart Supercenter in Jefferson County recently that may test that legal premise. A man was stopped in the store, searched and arrested on a charge of drug crimes, but the final verdict on whether it was a valid arrest is uncertain.   

Mother and 8-month pregnant daughter charged with drug crimes

There is a general movement in Arkansas and nationwide trending in the direction of rehabilitation in non-violent drug prosecutions. This is because the so-called war on drugs has been a disaster that has seen increased drug activities on all levels and fronts. The drug war did succeed in filling the nation's prisons to capacity at a cost of trillions of dollars, largely with non-violent individuals convicted of drug crimes. There is a growing consensus, even among some law enforcement offices, that the drug war should be wound down and replaced, where appropriate, with intensive treatment programs.

Man being held on charges of intending to distribute drugs

Police in Pine Bluff, Arkansas reported arresting one person recently on drug charges after searching a premises under the authority of a search warrant. Authorities estimated the 30.8 pounds of marijuana and 2.2 pounds of cocaine that they seized to have a street value of $194,600. In the raid, police found only one person on the premises and arrested the 53-year-old man for possession with intent to distribute drugs, along with other alleged drug crimes.

Search for guns and drug crimes nets little contraband

When a search warrant is issued for a private home, defense counsel must examine the warrant and the surrounding circumstances to determine whether there were deficiencies in the process. Fourth Amendment principles in Arkansas and all other states require that a search warrant be issued only upon probable cause, and that it must particularly describe the place and the subject matter being searched.  In most cases, when a search warrant or the search itself is determined to be deficient, the suppression of the evidence with respect to alleged drug crimes or gun charges will result in dismissal of the charged crimes.